Archive for the ‘voip’ Category

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Hacking 101: Cain & Abel

June 20, 2007

I came across this awesome utility at work today. Someone needed to desperately crack a Word document for a customer. So he sent out an email to all of the engineers asking if we had any tools (preferably free) to help him crack this document.

A few ideas came up – but by far, this has been the best idea. It may have not helped him out in his case, and that I’m not sure of. But I became curious and checked this tool out myself.

Cain & Abel is a free password recovery tool for Microsoft OS’s.

From their website:

Cain & Abel is a password recovery tool for Microsoft Operating Systems. It allows easy recovery of various kind of passwords by sniffing the network, cracking encrypted passwords using Dictionary, Brute-Force and Cryptanalysis attacks, recording VoIP conversations, decoding scrambled passwords, recovering wireless network keys, revealing password boxes, uncovering cached passwords and analyzing routing protocols. The program does not exploit any software vulnerabilities or bugs that could not be fixed with little effort. It covers some security aspects/weakness present in protocol’s standards, authentication methods and caching mechanisms; its main purpose is the simplified recovery of passwords and credentials from various sources, however it also ships some “non standard” utilities for Microsoft Windows users.

Cain & Abel has been developed in the hope that it will be useful for network administrators, teachers, security consultants/professionals, forensic staff, security software vendors, professional penetration tester and everyone else that plans to use it for ethical reasons. The author will not help or support any illegal activity done with this program. Be warned that there is the possibility that you will cause damages and/or loss of data using this software and that in no events shall the author be liable for such damages or loss of data. Please carefully read the License Agreement included in the program before using it.

The latest version is faster and contains a lot of new features like APR (Arp Poison Routing) which enables sniffing on switched LANs and Man-in-the-Middle attacks. The sniffer in this version can also analyze encrypted protocols such as SSH-1 and HTTPS, and contains filters to capture credentials from a wide range of authentication mechanisms. The new version also ships routing protocols authentication monitors and routes extractors, dictionary and brute-force crackers for all common hashing algorithms and for several specific authentications, password/hash calculators, cryptanalysis attacks, password decoders and  some not so common utilities related to network and system security.

Some of the new features of this release are:

– Automatic Certificate Collector for FTPS (implicit), IMAPS and POP3S protocols.
– FTPS Man-in-the-Middle Sniffer and password collector.
– POP3S Man-in-the-Middle Sniffer and password collector.
– IMAPS Man-in-the-Middle Sniffer and password collector.
– Added Windows Mail (Vista) Password Decoder for POP3, IMAP, NNTP, SMTP and LDAP accounts.
– Added PTW WEP cracking attack.
– Added Windows Vista support in Wireless Password Decoder.
– Wireless Password Decoder now uses DLL injection under XP.

Download Cain & Abel v 4.9.4 today (works on NT, 2000, and XP). Not sure if Vista is supported, according to the website, it’s not listed so I’m not sure.

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Microsoft unveils “Response Point” IP Phone System for Small Businesses

March 19, 2007

My boss just sent me a link on a small business VoIP solution from Microsoft called “Response Point”. Apparently, they are partnering with D-Link, Uniden, and and Quanta. Currently still in beta, there will be three models to choose from, each from their respective partners listed above.

What could this mean for the VoIP market?

I myself am really interested in the Asterisk/AsteriskNOW system, but after reading this, I’d really like to see what Response Point can do. Apparently, any basic tech can set up one of these systems in minutes.

There is not much information available yet, but it seems promising. As more and more companies are switching to VoIP, this may be the perfect time for Microsoft to jump in the VoIP game.

We’ll just have to see what happens.

Microsoft has always come along later when new technologies are introduced, and have known to work things so that administering and maintaining such technology will be easier with the Microsoft way. At least that is how I see it.

What are your thoughts?

Read the Microsoft Press Release here on “Response Point”.