Archive for the ‘tweaks’ Category

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Glary Utilities – All in one Utilities suite

February 5, 2008

Wouldn’t it be good if you could have one program that would do several useful things for your computer? Things such as optimizing it, cleaning it, and improving speed, reliability, privacy and security?

If this sounds good to you, then you might want to take Glary Utilities for a test drive. While the name may not sound too exciting, it seems to be a very good, well programmed, well thought out, and most importantly of all, useful piece of software.

Its an all in one utilities suite that has some very useful things that most computer users are sure to find useful at some stage. This includes a disk cleaner for scanning for and removing junk temp files from your computer to free up valuable space. It also has a registry cleaner which so far seems pretty good compared to most ones i’ve tried out, just be careful and try not to delete anything you’re not absolutely sure about. If in doubt, you can make a backup first. Other features enable you to delete empty folders and dead shortcuts.

More features include :

  • A startup manager ; for managing which programs run on startup;
  • A context menu optimizer; very handy for removing unused options from the context menu;
  • Tracks Eraser; Erases web browser tracks, history, cookies etc;
  • File Shredder; Deletes files permanently and irrecoverably;
  • File Undelete; for attempting to undelete accidentally deleted files;
  • File Encrypter and Decrypter; added privacy for sensitive or private files;
  • Disk Analysis; shows you the disk space usage of your files and folders;
  • Duplicate Files Finder; basic but somewhat effective tool for finding duplicate files, checks by name and file size;
  • File Splitter and Joiner; for splitting large files into smaller manageable files, and rejoining them;
  • Process Manager; useful tool to see what’s running on your computer, good to know so that you can find dangerous or unnecessary programs;
  • Internet Explorer Assistant; for managing or removing browser helper objects.

On top of all this, its available in a totally freeware version. The only difference between the free and paid version seems to be that the “One click maintenance” option can’t be set to run automatically in the free version.

I recommend this to anyone looking for a simple way of maintaining their computer, that works and delivers as promised.

Go check out the homepage here for more info and the download.

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How to remove the Vista RDP Prompt

October 4, 2007

You know what I’m talking about. That pesky authentication check when you RDP to a pre-Vista machine. Sick of that? Well, so am I. And luckily, one of my fellow engineers discovered this. Here’s the fix!

You know, this one:

The registry key is a DWORD value at \\HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Terminal Server Client\AuthenticationLevelOverride

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/895433 

Here are the 3 possible values, at least in Windows Server 2003:

Set the authentication level value to one of the following values:

•    0 This value corresponds to “No authentication.”
•    1 This value corresponds to “Require authentication.”
•    2 This value corresponds to “Attempt authentication.”

I experimented and found that 2 is the default now.  I tested the 3 modes and found that:

0 -> Doesn’t prompt. 
1 -> Gives a similar message but doesn’t allow me to continue.  This is the strictest.
2 -> Gives the message but allows me to accept and continue.

In my case, I don’t even want the prompt so I set AuthenticationLevelOverride to 0 and I’m able to log into my Remote Desktop sessions without that extra prompt.

Warning: this is a decrease in security so should only be changed if you are aware of the what and why of this change.

OR

You could use Visionapp’s vRD or RoyalTS – two amazing RDP managers. Then you don’t have to worry about all that stuff either. Just store your credentials and go!

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Need to remove items out of the Add/Remove Programs list?

July 8, 2007

Ever uninstall something and its still listed in the Add/Remove programs list? Or maybe a rogue program showed up in the list and has since been removed with an anti-malware utility. But it keeps showing up in the list! Here’s how to remove it in Windows 2000/XP/2003:

1.
Click Start, click Run, type regedit in the Open box, and then press ENTER.

2.
Locate and click the following registry key:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Uninstall

3.
After you click the Uninstall registry key, click Export Registry File on the Registry menu.

4.
In the Export Registry File dialog box, click Desktop in the Save in box, type uninstall in the File name box, and then click Save.

5.
Each key under Uninstall represents a program that appears in Add/Remove Programs. To determine which program that each key represents, click the key, and then view the following values:

DisplayName – the value data for the DisplayName key is the name that is listed in Add/Remove Programs
-and-
UninstallString – the value data for the UninstallString key is the program that is used to uninstall the program

6.
After you identify the registry key that represents the program that is still in Add/Remove Programs, right-click the key, and then click Delete.

7.
After you delete the key, click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel.

8.
In Control Panel, double-click Add/Remove Programs.

9.
In Add/Remove Programs, verify that the program for which you deleted the registry key is not listed.

10.
If the program list is not correct in Add/Remove Programs, you can double-click the Uninstall.reg file on your desktop to restore the original list of programs in the registry.

11.
If the program list is correct in Add/Remove Programs, you can right-click the Uninstall.reg file on your desktop, and then click Delete.

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Speed Up Adobe Reader 8

May 26, 2007

Originally on Lifehacker… quite possibly the greatest blog EVER.

All you want to do is view that PDF, but Adobe Reader takes forever to load, especially on an older PC. If an Adobe Reader alternative isn’t a possibility for you, the Arsgeek weblog’s got a quick speedup tip for Adobe Reader 8’s excruciatingly slow load time. Just remove the “accessability.api” file.

To remove this ‘feature’ simply navigate to your %Program Files%\Adobe\Reader 8.0\reader\plug_ins folder, and rename (delete, copy elsewhere) the ‘accessability.api’ file. The same file exists, but in slightly different locations, in older version of Acrobat Reader.

Arsgeek warns that removing the accessability.api file will take with it Adobe’s ability to read documents out-loud. I’m willing to trade Adobe reading my documents out-loud like Ben Stein for the increase in speed. Goodbye, accessability.api!